The Wives of Los Alamos: Review

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I thought that the premise of this book sounded fantastic and I couldn’t wait to read it, yet when I actually sat down to read it, I found that the execution just wasn’t that great.

This book was written in a very unique manner. The narrator of the story refers to everyone as “we” or “some of us”, rather than referring to the majority of characters by their names. At first I was fine with this stylistic decision, I found it fitting to the story, and thought that it added a nice touch. Yet as the story wore on, I got incredibly annoyed with it. After a couple chapters in, it got difficult to read everything as “we” or “some of us” and I found myself growing frustrated with the book and author. I wish that the characters had been referred to more by their names instead, I would have found that a lot easier to read.

The story itself was interesting. I had never previously read a book about anything like this, so it was an interesting story to follow. I wish that I had been able to finish it without the writing driving me nuts, because I probably would have been able to enjoy the story a lot more that way.

Overall, I just couldn’t get past the writing in this book. The reference to characters as “we” just irked me and I wasn’t able to fully enjoy the story because of that. I was rather disappointed with this book.

I received this book for review purposes via NetGalley.

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One thought on “The Wives of Los Alamos: Review

    Saynday's Elusive Muse said:
    November 17, 2013 at 4:17 PM

    This sounds like a case of literary device gone bad. I like how you mentioned you were open to the device at the onset of the reading. Then the device was overused. Using a collective third person narrator can difficult to manage. It takes careful balance between focusing on the collective and the individual’s in the story. Thank you for the review.

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